Users of ISIS Neutron and Muon Source honoured by The Royal Society
28 Jul 2017
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Two users of ISIS Neutron and Muon Source, Professor Matthew Rosseinsky and Professor Peter Bruce, have been awarded medals from The Royal Society for their outstanding contributions to science.

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​​An aerial view of ISIS Neutron and Muon Source. Credit: STFC. 

 

The Royal Society has recently announced the winners of a number of medals and awards which recognise researchers who have made exceptional contributions to science. Further details on all awards can be found here.

The Davy Medal

ISIS Neutron and Muon Source user Professor Matthew Rosseinsky has been awarded the 2017 Davy Medal for his advances in the design and discovery of functional materials, integrating the development of new experimental and computational techniques. The Davy Medal is awarded annually to an outstanding researcher in the field of chemistry and was first presented in 1877.

Professor Rosseinsky has made influential discoveries in the field of materials chemistry, particularly in the synthetic chemistry of solid state electronic materials and novel microporous structures, which have applications ranging from catalysis to information storage. He works on the development of new methods of identifying functional materials, emphasising the integration of experiment with computational methods.

A list of Professor Rosseinsky's publications which are associated with ISIS Neutron and Muon source can be found on the open archive for STFC research publications here.

Professor Rosseinsky is due to receive a medal of bronze, and a gift of £2,000 at the Society's Anniversary Day Meeting on 30 November 2017.  Further details are given on The Royal Society website.

The Hughes Medal

A second ISIS Neutron and Muon Source user Professor Peter Bruce has been awarded the 2017 Hughes Medal for his distinguished work elucidating the fundamental chemistry underpinning energy storage.  The Hughes Medal is awarded biennially to an outstanding researcher in the field of energy and was first presented in 1902.

Professor Bruce works in the fields of solid state chemistry and electrochemistry, with a particular emphasis on energy storage. His research involves the investigation of ionically conducting solids and intercalation compounds. By understanding the properties of such materials, he is able to examine their application in devices such as fuel cells and rechargeable lithium batteries.

Professor Bruce uses ISIS to conduct extensive studies of the structures of materials used in battery electrodes. By placing lithium batteries in a neutron beam, he is able to study what happens to the charge-carrying lithium ions in the crystal structures during many charging/discharging cycles. Neutron diffraction is a more powerful technique than using X-rays for this work because lithium ions are weak scatterers of X-rays whereas with neutrons their relative scattering contribution is much greater.

As lithium is a light element, neutron diffraction is a more powerful technique than using X-rays for this work as lithium ions are weak scatterers of X-rays whereas with neutrons their relative scattering contribution is much greater.

A list of Professor Bruce's publications which are associated with ISIS Neutron and Muon source can be found on the open archive for STFC research publications here.

Professor Bruce will receive a medal of silver gilt, and a gift of £2,000 at the Society's Anniversary Day meeting on 30 November 2017. Further details are given on The Royal Society website.

All of us here at ISIS Neutron and Muon Source would like to congratulate our users on their prestigious awards.


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