Muons
28 Jan 2009
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In addition to neutron production, ISIS is the world's most intense source of pulsed muons for condensed matter research.

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ISIS EC Muon Beamline separation
​​​​ISIS EC Muon Beamline separation​
 

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Positive Spin - Muon Group Newsletter

For the latest issue please click HERE (April 2018)

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Muon Spectroscopy User Meeting:

Future Developments and Site Calculations

 

Monday 16th and Tuesday 17th July 2018, at The Cosener’s House, Abingdon, UK

 

To mark a new agreement between ISIS and RIKEN for future operation of the RIKEN-RAL facility and to highlight the developing plans for a major upgrade of the ISIS MuSR spectrometer, we are planning a User Meeting discussing the development of new instrumentation at ISIS. Talks will focus on the scientific opportunities that these developments will bring.

 

We are also planning to include a session within this meeting discussing muon site calculations. There is currently a major effort by a number of groups to develop new techniques in this area; talks are planned with the opportunity for group discussion of these methods.

 

Also planned is an informal session giving students an opportunity to present their PhD work in a few minutes - everyone will get the chance to speak!

 

All are welcome to attend. For UK-based academics full costs of will be covered; otherwise we are happy to pay local costs associated with the meeting.

 

Further details and a link to a registration website will be available shortly

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Future Muon Sources          

A meeting between the Accelerator Applications Network of EuCARD2 and NMI3’s Muon Joint Research Activity was hosted by Bob Cywinski at the University of Huddersfield to discuss development/application of future muon sources. Talks considered new technologies required for the production of Ultra Slow beams and muon Microscopes as well as a forward look to new applications of muon techniques.

A report about the event can be found HERE  

Slides from the presentations can be found HERE 

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ISIS sample environment Details of all equipment can be found here

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Muon Xpress service : information about access for initial sample characterisation and feasibility checks

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A leaflet advertising the muon technique can be found here.

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Muon instrument schedules: visit the individual instrument pages and click on the 'Schedule' link

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The muon instruments MuSR, EMU, ARGUS and HiFi run a very diverse science programme, using implanted positive muons both as magnetic probes, in magnetism, superconductivity and charge transport, and as proton analogues in chemical physics, including investigations of hydrogen behaviour in semiconductors, molecular dynamics and light particle diffusion. 

Spin-polarised muons are generated at ISIS by collisions between the proton beam and a thin carbon target. For condensed matter studies, positive muons are implanted into materials and the time-evolution of the muon polarisation is observed. Highlights of work using ISIS muons include the discovery of shallow donor hydrogen states in semiconductors; characterisation of correlations in spin-glass materials and investigation of spin dynamics in frustrated systems; charge-carrier motion studies in conducting polymers; characterisation of flux line lattice behaviour in organic superconductors; study of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in high-temperature superconductors; and investigation of quantum tunnelling of light particles.

Muons can be used to study a wide variety of magnetic systems, with the muon acting as a microscopic magnetometer and probing longer fluctuation timescales compared with neutron scattering. Muons are suitable for studies of small-moment, short-range, random, or dilute magnetism. In superconducting materials, muons can be used to explore the flux-line lattice generated when a field is applied to a type-II material, complementing small-angle neutron scattering measurements in some cases. Muons can be used to determine fundamental superconducting parameters such as the penetration depth, coherence length, superconducting carrier density and effective mass. They can also be used to study various charge transport phenomena, including ion mobility in battery cathode materials, electron dynamics or charge carrier motion in conducting polymers.

The positive muon can act like a light proton. Where proton or hydrogen atom behaviour is difficult or impossible to study directly, observation of the muon response can enable models of its heavier counterpart to be produced; examples include investigation of hydrogen behaviour in semiconductors. In molecular materials, muons can form radical states sensitive to molecular dynamics, and can be used to study chemical reactions. 

The RIKEN-RAL muon facility supports a wide range of muon investigations. In addition to condensed matter studies, there is ongoing work into the physics of muon catalysed fusion, which occurs in deuterium-tritium mixtures when negative muons take the place of electrons in the hydrogen atom isotopes. There are also experiments using negative muons to measure nuclear charge distributions, together with development of low-energy muon beams.

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